Category – Releases
123 posts tagged with "Releases" (See all categories)

Synapse 1.59 released

2022-05-18 — Releases — Brendan Abolivier

Synapse 1.59 is out! Let's see what's new in this version.

Generic worker types

When Synapse instances are subject to high load, it can be useful to use workers to balance the load more effectively. Workers are separate processes that can take some of the load off the main Synapse process, and allow the homeserver to scale more effectively.

In the past, Synapse only provided a specific set of types of workers, each capable of handling a specific set of operations. For some time now we have been working on allowing more flexibility around worker configuration, which started all the way back in Synapse 1.12.0 with the introduction of a generic worker application type.

Synapse 1.59 furthers this work by deprecating the synapse.app.appservice and synapse.app.user_dir worker application types. Homeserver administrators should change the configuration of instances using these types to the generic synapse.app.generic_worker application type, and use the notify_appservices_from_worker and update_user_directory_from_worker to delegate application service and user directory work (respectively) to a worker.

See the upgrade notes for more information on this change.

Push rules

Push rules allow Matrix clients to define notification rules on a homeserver. One often reported issue with notification in Matrix is the fact that notifications are sent out when server ACLs, which define which server(s) can and cannot interact in a room, change. This is especially annoying during big waves of abuse, as there might be multiple servers that need to be banned from rooms, thus causing a lot of unneeded notifications.

Synapse 1.59 now supports silencing server ACL updates, by implementing the new push rule documented in MSC3786. However, since this MSC hasn't been incorporated into the spec yet, this behaviour is disabled by default in Synapse: see the implementation pull request for more information on turning it on.

Synapse 1.59 also allows third-party modules to validate and change the actions associated with an existing push rule via the Module API. This is helpful for modules wishing to, for example, configuring specific notification settings when new users register.

Everything else

As of Synapse 1.59, Synapse will not communicate the name of devices over federation (unless configured otherwise), in order to better preserve user privacy. See the upgrade notes for more information.

Also note that we have issued a patch release for 1.59 (1.59.1) which fixes a long-standing bug that started to bite a good amount of server administrators. Server admins that are looking into upgrading their instance to Synapse 1.59 are recommended to upgrade to 1.59.1 rather than 1.59.0.

See the full changelog for a complete list of changes in this release. Also please have a look at the upgrade notes for this version.

Synapse is a Free and Open Source Software project, and we'd like to extend our thanks to everyone who contributed to this release, including (in no particular order) Beeper, Dirk Klimpel, Šimon Brandner, henryclw and Andrew Do.

Synapse 1.58 released

2022-05-05 — Releases — Brendan Abolivier

Synapse 1.58 is out! Let's dive into this new release.

Poetry

If you've been reading the past few Synapse release announcements, you might have already heard about our efforts to integrate Poetry into Synapse. Poetry is a tool which manages dependencies of a Python project. Its killer feature is its lockfile, which explicitly pins all dependencies (direct and transitive) to a fixed version, even across multiple Python versions and platforms. See more about why we choose Poetry here.

During the past few months, we've been hard at work converting Synapse and its CI to use Poetry. The goal is to make our Docker images and Debian packages more reproducible and to provide a fixed, known-good environment for CI. This will help us to ensure the stability and security of Synapse installations.

Synapse 1.57's Docker image was the first to use Poetry; after a successful trial, this was extended to Synapse 1.58's Debian packages. Installations from PyPI using pip will not use the locked environment, though everyone is welcome to install from source using our lockfile.

Huge props to David from the Synapse team for leading the work on this front.

Everything else

This release of Synapse also includes performance improvements around sharing device list updates, which should greatly improve login times for large Matrix accounts.

Synapse 1.58 also features the implementation of two MSCs: MSC3383 to include a destination parameter in federation authentication headers, and MSC2815 which (if enabled) allows room moderators to see the content of a redacted event (as long as it hasn't already been deleted by the homeserver).

See the full changelog for a complete list of changes in this release. Also please have a look at the upgrade notes for this version.

Synapse is a Free and Open Source Software project, and we'd like to extend our thanks to everyone who contributed to this release, including (in no particular order) Beeper, Dirk Klimpel, Famedly and Sami Olmari.

0.34.0 security release for matrix-appservice-irc (High severity)

2022-05-04 — Releases, Security — Tadeusz Sośnierz

We've released updates to matrix-appservice-irc and our forked node-irc that it depends on to patch a High security vulnerability. It's advised to update to 0.34.0 as soon as possible.

The vulnerability allows an attacker to manipulate a Matrix user into executing IRC commands by having them reply to a maliciously crafted message.

Incorrect handling of a CR character allowed for making part of the message be sent to the IRC server verbatim rather than as a message to the channel.

If you are currently a matrix-appservice-irc user, exercise caution when replying to messages from untrusted participants in IRC bridged rooms until your bridge instance has been upgraded.

The vulnerability has been patched in node-irc version 1.2.1 and matrix-appservice-irc 0.34.0. You can get the release on Github.

The bridges running on the Libera Chat, OFTC and other networks bridged by the Matrix.org Foundation have been patched.

The vulnerabilities are tracked as GHSA-37hr-348p-rmf4 and GHSA-52rh-5rpj-c3w6.

Thank you, Val Lorentz for reporting this vulnerability.

Synapse 1.57 released

2022-04-19 — Releases — Brendan Abolivier

Hey everyone! Guess what? Synapse 1.57 has just been released! Let's see what's new in this version!

Application services

Application services are piece of software that have privileged access to some of the homeserver's features. For example, they can create and manage multiple users at the same time, which is especially useful for bridges.

This release of Synapse changes the way Synapse manually manages transaction identifiers when talking to application services (a transaction being a group of events the application service should know about). While this doesn't have much impact on the everyday life of a server administrator (besides fixing a bug and paving the way for future performance improvements), this change means server admins should take extra care when updating Synapse.

More specifically, if you are running a dedicated Synapse worker for handling traffic related to application services, this worker must be stopped when upgrading the main Synapse process to ensure the update is performed safely. See the upgrade notes for more information about this change, and instructions on recovering from an incorrect upgrade.

This release of Synapse also continues work on bringing end-to-end capabilities to application services, which I was already telling you about in the Synapse 1.50 release blog post. More specifically, Synapse now supports sending device list updates to applications services, as part of implementing MSC3202. This is still very experimental and definitely not production ready, but also very exciting!

Improvements to the module system

Modules allow third-party developers to expand Synapse with extra features that wouldn't necessarily fit into the Matrix specification and/or ecosystem. In the past release of Synapse, we have been improving this system to add more functionality to it, and this one is no exception!

Synapse modules can now implement new callbacks to react to account data updates, as well as to react to new 3PID (email address, phone number) associations. On the latter, note that this callback will only be called after a 3PID has been validated on the homeserver, and does not trigger when the validation happens on an identity server (e.g. when publishing a 3PID so that other users can look it up).

The ModuleApi (which is the Python class enabling modules to interact with Synapse) has also been updated to allow module to read and write global account data. This can be done by using the new AccountDataManager class, which can be accessed as api.account_data_manager (where api is an instance of ModuleApi).

The module API has also been updated with a new method, to allow modules to promote an existing user to server administrator (or demote a server administrator to a normal user). This follows up on an improvement introduced in Synapse 1.56 allowing modules to promote users to server administrators when registering them.

Everything else

This release also includes a performance improvement for workers handling /sync requests. While this change makes starting this kind of workers slightly more heavy performance-wise, it aims at improving the load associated with the first /sync requests hitting it right after starting. See this comment for more details.

Synapse 1.57 also now includes bundled aggregations in message search results by default, as MSC3666 has been accepted and has finished its final comment period.

See the full changelog for a complete list of changes in this release. Also please have a look at the upgrade notes for this version.

Synapse is a Free and Open Source Software project, and we'd like to extend our thanks to everyone who contributed to this release, including (in no particular order) Beeper, Dirk Klimpel, Famedly and Jorge Florian.

Synapse 1.56 released

2022-04-05 — Releases — Brendan Abolivier

Happy release day everyone! Synapse 1.56 is out! Let's have a look at what's new in this release.

Additional restrictions around registration

One common abuse scenario we have seen on Matrix over the years is attackers making use of public homeservers with open registration to automatically create multiple accounts in order to evade sanctions. Sometimes, this can lead to these public homeservers being banned across multiple public rooms despite their administrator(s) not being directly at fault.

In order to mitigate this, starting from this release, Synapse will refuse to start by default if it is configured with open registration with no additional verification. This means users wishing to register on these homeservers will need to authenticate themselves, either via email, recaptcha or registration tokens.

Please see the upgrade notes for more information.

So long groups, and thanks for all the fish

Long-time users of Matrix might remember when, way back in 2017, we introduced groups (also known as communities in some clients). Groups would let users define a curated set of users and rooms to represent a given community that others could refer to. We even used to have +matrix:matrix.org which was the official group for the Matrix team and community.

If this sounds a bit familiar to you (and remind you of a certain other feature of Matrix), that's no coincidence. Some time ago, we had already identified a good amount of shortcomings with groups, and decided to redesign the feature entirely and release it under the name "spaces". If you're curious about this, then you may wish to read the spaces announcement blogpost we released at the time.

Now that spaces have been out of beta for some time, and have shown to be a very useful feature to the ecosystem, we decided it was time to retire support for groups from Synapse, after more than 4 years of good and loyal service. This release of Synapse deprecates the feature, with a plan to disable it by default in Synapse 1.58 (which is expected to be released next month).

Everything else

As of this version, Synapse will also refuse to start the if the Postgres database it is running against has a non-C locale, in order to prevent accidental database corruption. See the upgrade notes for more information.

This release also includes the ability for modules to register server administrators through the register_user method, as well as a new method to allow modules to store external 3PID associations into Synapse's database.

See the full changelog for a complete list of changes in this release. Also please have a look at the upgrade notes for this version.

Synapse is a Free and Open Source Software project, and we'd like to extend our thanks to everyone who contributed to this release, including (in no particular order) Dirk Klimpel, Beeper, Famedly, IronTooch and villepeh.

Synapse 1.55 released

2022-03-22 — Releases — Brendan Abolivier

Hi all, Synapse 1.55 is out! Let's see the main talking points of this new release.

Update: After the initial release of Synapse 1.55, the developers of a third-party tool (Jinja, which is the tool Synapse uses to render email and web templates) released a new version of their project which proved incompatible with Synapse. To address this issue, we have released Synapse 1.55.2.

Deployments of Synapse using the matrixdotorg/synapse Docker image or Debian packages from packages.matrix.org are not affected as they are already using a compatible version of the tool.

It's worth noting that the work we are doing to integrate Poetry into Synapse (more on that a bit further in this post) will, once completed, prevent this kind of issues from happening.

Removing support for Mjolnir 1.3.1 and older

Administrators of large homeservers and communities will already be familiar with Mjolnir, which is a tool designed to help them moderate a large number of rooms in an efficient way. It includes a bot as well as a Synapse module to better interface with the homeserver.

Due to a change in how we manage some of Synapse's internal utilities, this release of Synapse breaks compatibility with Mjolnir versions 1.3.1 and older. Homeserver administrators using Mjolnir and upgrading to Synapse 1.55 should make sure they're running Mjolnir version 1.3.2 or later.

See the upgrade notes for more information.

Moving synctl

synctl is a tool provided as part of Synapse to run and manage your instance and its workers (if any).

As part of our work to integrate Poetry in Synapse (which in turn will enable a lot of cool things, such as reproducible builds), we have recently moved the way we package this tool. As of this release, homeserver administrators should stop invoking it using its direct path (e.g. /path/to/synctl start), but should instead call it directly, e.g. synctl start.

This means homeserver administrators using synctl must make sure that the tool is in their PATH. This is automatically done when installing and upgrading Synapse using the matrixdotorg/synapse Docker image or Debian packages from packages.matrix.org. When installing from a wheel, sdist, or PyPI, an executable is created in your Python installation's bin directory.

See the upgrade notes for more information.

Everything else

This release also introduces new module callbacks, allowing homeserver administrators to more efficiently review which users are able to deactivate users and shutdown rooms. More information on that in Synapse's documentation.

We have also started experimenting with using the native Python asyncio event loop in Synapse which, if successful, would make it easier to use building blocks from the Python ecosystem when adding new features to Synapse.

See the full changelog for a complete list of changes in this release. Also please have a look at the upgrade notes for this version.

Synapse is a Free and Open Source Software project, and we'd like to extend our thanks to everyone who contributed to this release, including (in no particular order) Dirk Klimpel, Beeper, and ~creme.

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